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minor muppetz

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Recently I've been reading the Follow That Bird page on TV Tropes, and noticed under executive meddling it says that the studio let the director do whatever he wanted just because the studio didn't really care. But then would that really be executive meddling? Of course the Children's Television Workshop would have probably cared to meddle if necessary, even if Warner Bros. did not.
 

D'Snowth

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Yeah, that wouldn't be Executive Meddling at all. Unless it's noted as an aversion or subversion, then yeah, that wouldn't be a very accurate entry.
 

D'Snowth

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I mean yeah, like any other wiki on the internet, anyone can edit the information on TV Tropes, whether it's legit/credible or not.
 

D'Snowth

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I haven't looked on TV Tropes in a while, but I see they've done away with a lot of sections and/or items since I've last looked, such as Getting Crap Past the Radar and Memetic Mutation. I remember the latter being an example of how inconsisent the staff was when it came to examples of something being listed on a page: for instance, I added a Memetic Mutation to a page based on Nostalgia Critic basically turning it into a meme (in this case, the way Cornelius in ONCE UPON A FOREST says "rrrrrrheumatism"), but the staff deleted it saying it was a "shoehorned example." Yeah, okay, so why were they okay with other examples throughout the wiki being listed as Memetic Mutations because of Nostalgia Critic turning them into a meme in his reviews?
 

minor muppetz

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Last night I was editing things in the page for the show Newhart, and in the edit format, it says not to list tropes without explaining examples (which I was told when I signed up, though I often do see it on pages), and also with tropes not to just list a character or episode title or something like that without further explanation, or else they'll only show up in editing mode (I fixed some of those examples so they can show up in published mode). And I didn't see this at the top of editing mode for other things (though I haven't edited pages for many shows since).

Seems weird, in some of those cases I don't really know what to say to expand them. This is the case with things like "Christmas episode" or "Valentines Episode" or something like that, where somebody lists the trope and episode name, but it still won't show up to viewers not editing the page. I guess there's a point when the examples only list a characters name without further elaboration, but at times I am unsure what more to put.
 

minor muppetz

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Was thinking about one trivia trope, The Danza, where an actor plays a character with the same first name. The trope namer is Tony Danza, who almost always plays a character named Tony on a television series (though he voiced a character named Mickey on Baby Talk).

Shouldn't this be called The Tony instead? After all, it's his first name that he retains for his characters, not his last name.
 

LittleJerry92

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If you have a heavy Brooklyn NY accent and you’re a man then Tony is the first name to come into my mind.
 

D'Snowth

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I'm wondering if there's a specific trope that covers something that SVU provides two specific examples of. . . .

1. There was that season where Detective Chester Lake was transfered into the squad and, for whatever reason, partnered up with Fin, even though Munch was still on the show at that point. Anyway, Fin and Lake barely had any chemistry whatsoever, yet by the end of the season with Lake's final episode where he goes rogue and becomes a dirty cop, then all of the sudden Fin is all concerned about his welfare and emphasizes that he's his partner, despite others telling him that he never made any effort to get to know him as a partner - even Lake himself tells Fin this when Fin acts like he knows what kind of person he is, and what he would or wouldn't do.

2. Detective Cassidy was part of the squad for only half of the first season, and was Munch's original partner before Fin . . . then several, several seasons later, Cassidy returns to the show in another unit, and for whatever reason, he and Olivia Benson end up becoming romantically involved with each other, despite neither of them showing anything of the sort for one another prior to his return.

So, what I guess I'm getting at is, is there a trope for when there are two certain characters that basically have no use for each other, but then all of the sudden, it's as if they were tight with each other all along despite their lack of interaction or involvement?
 
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