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The "You know what?" thread

D'Snowth

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I used to watch SUPERMARKET SWEEP quite a bit when it was on . . . I think Food Network has basically been trying to do their own version of it in recent years.
 

minor muppetz

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In The Empire Strikes Back, both Yoda and the force ghost of Obi Wan Kenobi warn Luke against fighting Darth Vader to save his friends, worried that Darth might turn Luke to the dark side. But now I wonder if they were really discouraging Luke because they suspected Darth Vader would reveal that he was.... You know.
 

minor muppetz

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In the first four seasons of The Simpsons, the shows animation was provided by Klashy-Csupo. Around the time that the Simpson's made a cameo in the Sesame Street song Monster in the Mirror, Klasky-Csupo was animating segments for Sesame Street. I wouldn't be surprised if the company animated The Simpson's scene there (did they do the animated Grover reflection?), or even had a hand in getting permission to use The Simpson's.
 

minor muppetz

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Considering Muppet Wiki now has complete guides for most of seasons 20-present, plus complete guides for seasons 10, 11, and 13, I figure that if the wiki currently doesn't list an episode number for a segment known to have debuted in the 1980s, or if the wiki finds an unknown segment from that decade, it likely didn't appear in a whole lot of episodes.

Though it's possible you can say that about a lot of inserts that debuted in seasons 10-13.
 

D'Snowth

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When I really think about it, it seems to me that of the three major CGI animation studios (well, those that were once the top three major CGI animation studios), DreamWorks has been the most consistent with their overall animation and the evolution of such . . . I mean even the original SHREK still holds up very well today, and actually looks far more detailed, textured, and advanced compared to either Pixar or Blue Sky's earlier outings. It still strikes me crazy at how the original TOY STORY, while still an amazing movie, has not held up well over the years at all; the original ICE AGE to a lesser extent.
 

Pig's Laundry

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When I really think about it, it seems to me that of the three major CGI animation studios (well, those that were once the top three major CGI animation studios), DreamWorks has been the most consistent with their overall animation and the evolution of such . . . I mean even the original SHREK still holds up very well today, and actually looks far more detailed, textured, and advanced compared to either Pixar or Blue Sky's earlier outings. It still strikes me crazy at how the original TOY STORY, while still an amazing movie, has not held up well over the years at all; the original ICE AGE to a lesser extent.
Oh yeah, there was a video about Pixar's evolution recently

Like, Sid's dog looks way more smooth and unsettling than I remember!
 

minor muppetz

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In one segment, Grover sells newspapers, and his unfortunate customer is not Mr. Johnson, though by that point Mr. Johnson primarily only dealt with Grover as a waiter, aside from the singing telegrams sketch he would not regularly end up being Grover's customer everywhere for a few years.


And then in this season, there's a segment where Keegan Michael-Key works at the newsstand, Mr. Johnson is the first customer... and it's a rare one where Mr. Johnson is a customer to somebody other than Grover (and Grover doesn't even appear in the sketch).

 

D'Snowth

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I see now that Comcast is categorizing Muppet movies as being in the "Children" genre . . . something I know would really, really irk Jim.
 

minor muppetz

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In UHF, there's two different scenes involving Town Talk, and yet the two scenes make it seem like they're two different shows that share a title, genre, and host. And outside of those scenes, there's never any mention that George Newman hosts a talk show (there's barely any mention that he was Uncle Nutzy, either, but we do see him dressed as the character outside of the Uncle Nutzy's Clubhouse scenes).
 

minor muppetz

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I used to think that the hot air balloon sequence in The Great Muppet Caper was done on an indoor set, with the wideshots being a miniature, and thought that the "Hey, a Movie!" number was done outdoors in a real city street. And yet it's the other way around.

Also, on the Moving Right Along podcast, they say that the street is obviously a set. Is it really so obvious? Because I don't really see anything fake about it.
 
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