Disability Corner

fuzzygobo

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I know his passing is tough for you to deal with.
But here's the harshest reality. Nobody is going to be here forever. We will all get old. We will all die. Me, you, everybody. No exceptions.
The best way to minimize your grief (in legal terms it's called mitigating your damages) is to remember how much time you got to spend with him and how much he was loved.
And here's where your faith is put to the test. Believing you'll see him again someday.
When you get to be my age, you're going to see a LOT of funerals. For your friend's sake, you should take comfort in knowing he's not suffering anymore.

Some fool on here didn't like the idea of people dying, so he proclaimed he was not going to die!!
Good luck with that. You'll be able to pull off something Jesus couldn't do.

It may be painful now that he's gone, but life still goes on. It has to.
 

Katzi428

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Well....guess what. He died today.

My family and I as well as his wife are very sad and depressed over what happened to that amazing person.

We miss him very much and this is by far the saddest day of my life perhaps ever.

Why is it the saddest? Well, because while I have witnessed the passing of pets, friends, and beloved celebrities I've never actually lost a family member before in my entire life. While this guy wasn't technically family, he was about as close to a family member as a friend can get. He came to all of our Christmas and Thanksgiving festivities that were usually just reserved for members of our family only, he practically helped my parents raise me when I was a child and they had their hands full, and he hung out at our house all the time.

So yeah, this is by far the hardest thing I've ever had to witness.
Ohhh FP I'm sorry :sympathy: . You said you knew the guy for a long time.
 

fuzzygobo

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If my calculations are correct, right about now is my 100th dialysis session.
For those who don't know, dialysis is a procedure where they take the impurities and toxins out of your blood because your kidneys don't work.
Basically a machine pumps out your dirty blood and pumps it back in clean. The procedure takes about four hours, three times a week.
It doesn't hurt, but for some people it tires them out or makes them nauseous. It affects diabetics, and mostly older people, but children can have it too.
It's a chore, but I can't complain because it's keeping me alive. With the possibility of a kidney transplant, I won't have to do this anymore. But until that day, I just keep on truckin'.
 

RubberChicArt

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I have a small lisp and ADHD. I’m gonna get braces so that the lisp goes away, so that’s good. My ADHD symptoms sucks. I get distracted easily, I forget stuff I don’t care about, randomly run around (at appropriate times), I bounce my leg when I’m bored and sitting, and my brain never stops thinking (that’s the worst one). But the ADHD gave me creativity and curiosity, which is something I’m grateful for thanks to Jim Henson.
 

LittleJerry92

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Well....guess what. He died today.

My family and I as well as his wife are very sad and depressed over what happened to that amazing person.

We miss him very much and this is by far the saddest day of my life perhaps ever.

Why is it the saddest? Well, because while I have witnessed the passing of pets, friends, and beloved celebrities I've never actually lost a family member before in my entire life. While this guy wasn't technically family, he was about as close to a family member as a friend can get. He came to all of our Christmas and Thanksgiving festivities that were usually just reserved for members of our family only, he practically helped my parents raise me when I was a child and they had their hands full, and he hung out at our house all the time.

So yeah, this is by far the hardest thing I've ever had to witness.
Sorry for your loss, man. Hoping the best for you!
 

Flaky Pudding

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I'm honestly not sure whether or not this is the proper topic to post this in but there's something I really need to address:

There was a time not that long ago where I was completely off my ADHD medication for the first time in my entire life. That lack of medication affected everything in my life up to and including the posts I made here on the forum.

There were plenty of depressing, unusually angry, obsessive, dumb, or just plain bizarre posts I made here from late 2016-early 2017. So please keep in mind that whenever you read a post I wrote during that particular era, it's always important to remember the context of the time it was written. There are countless things I said on here back then that I now find ridiculously embarrassing looking back. I just want you all to know that they no longer reflect the person I am today.

Just the sheer amount of ridiculousness and insanity I spewed on here makes me cringe so hard. I don't want to say which posts I'm referring to because I don't want to bring any unneeded attention to them but if you stumble across an old one that's particularly messed up, remember that I was going through rough times when I posted it and most likely would never say that now. There was never anything flat out hateful or offensive, just crazy stuff that makes me sound ridiculous.
 

Daffyfan4ever

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I've noticed that there are quite a few members of this forum who have disabilities. Thus I think there should be a thread where members can talk about their disabilities, mental or physical, without fear of ridicule. In this thread you can talk about the advantages and disadvantages about your condition, ask for advice from others if you feel inclined, or, whether or not you're disabled, even give advice to those who ask. Non-disabled members are also welcome to talk about any disabled people they work with. By doing all that, maybe we can get to know each other better.

First off, both me and ssetta have Asperger's Syndrome. It's a form of autism which affects social skills, which creates a burden on one's childhood. It's very hard for someone with Asperger's to adapt to an environment, even if they've been there for a long time. But with me, I've made a good name for myself around the college I attend. My high school years were 90% pure torture, so you can imagine what a relief it is to make a fresh new start. I talk as much as I can with other people, in or out of my classes. Sometimes I'm a bit TOO self-conscious, but then again, so are a lot of people. Having been tortured and teased throughout high school, I know by now what makes a good impression and what makes a bad one (this especially applies towards this forum - I know what kind of posts give others a bad impression of you). But the more people I get to know, the bigger my confidence becomes. Since high school I've been yearning for a close relationship with a woman, but I tried all the wrong things, and thus was lectured sternly on how to behave around females. After awhile, I just stopped trying and started acting like a total eunich around them (talking about anything but romance) ... and astonishingly, it got pretty good results. Right now I'm dating a wonderful woman named Ronna, whom I met in a class last quarter and we've been dating since November. My relationship with her is the closest I've ever come to having true love. I'm doing things with her (and her younger sister Mindy, who also likes me) that I used to dream of doing with girls in high school: having nice, meaningful conversations; going to movies; dining out; and just plain exchanging happiness in general. Mindy also informs me about any faux pas I might be curious about ... now that's the kind of help I wish I had in high school.

As advantaged as this makes me sound, I must confess that I still feel a little disadvantaged. For example, at times I can get competitive. Thanks to my high school years, I often don't feel very attractive ('cause I'm not blonde or blue-eyed), Thus, I tend to rely on others to cheer me up (mostly my mom or my dad, and sometimes even my sister), because when such thoughts fill my head, it becomes harder and harder to make myself feel happy. Then again, you might say it's because I dig my own social grave since I decide to be by myself more often than be with people, because frequently, I'm extremely at peace by myself. However, I do get lonely, and I yearn for the company of others, but I'm slowly taking steps to expand my social network. It's not as easy for me as it is for everyone else (or so I've led myself to believe). Still, as long as I keep my head filled with happy thoughts, like knowing that Ronna and Mindy both find me attractive, I feel complete. For me, depression is a feeling that comes and goes like life itself.

Just like ssetta thinks it's not fair that Hilary Duff is given more attention than classic Sesame Street, I think it's not fair that more attention is paid to the field of acting than that of animation (the industry in which I plan to make a name for myself). Then again, they are two entirely different art forms, and each one is special in its own way. As long as I keep that in mind, then I'm all right.
Nearly two decades later:

I have a disability as well, a high functioning form of Autism known as Asperger's. Sometimes it's good to have that because it means I have a high level of intelligence, but I have faced a lot of ridicule and discrimination over time because of it. I won't bore you with these stories right now. But I never saw this 18-year old thread until today, so I thought this was something to address. I haven't really talked about it all that much on the forum. I can get into it more as time goes on.
 

LittleJerry92

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So last year I found out I actually have PDD (persuasive developmental disorder) which honestly explains a lot about me and why my mind doesn’t always process (certain) information right away. I also heard this (might) be a form of autism, and if that is, honestly it wouldn’t surprise me with certain things about myself and things I love and what have you.
 

D'Snowth

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I have been rather resistant and reluctant to even do this in years past because I feel like it's not really something I should concern myself with being a reasonably healthy young man, but in recent years, I've come to realize just how much worse my back problems are getting - much of which I know is due to the birth defect I have in my lower spine that curves inwardly (normal in a woman, but it shouldn't do that in a man): twice this year in a span of two months, I threw my back out just simply by bending over, and a year ago this month, I had my third severe episode of sciatica - my lower back and my entire right leg were in immense pain and inflammation, I was practically crippled for two weeks.

Because of this, I have come to the decision that even in spite of my young age and otherwise healthy life, I am going to try to sign up for Disability . . . because, let's face it: in the condition my back is in, I would be more of a hinderance and a liability in a setting where co-workers or clients depend on me to pull my share of a workload, and I'm not able to because of my back giving out on me. I'm well aware it's incredibly difficult to get approved for disability, and in some cases can take years of rejection before finally getting accepted, but in all honesty, after assessing my situation and everything, I'm afraid this is the most practical route I need to take for my own future, especially financially speaking.
 

fuzzygobo

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It takes a lot to get approved for Disability. It would take notes from several doctors to say you can’t do this work, you can only stand for this long, you can only lift this much, etc.

The thing that could make them reject your claim, are you capable of a desk job? If so,
you’re back to Square One.

If you do get approved for Disability is, whatever your last job was, count on receiving 2/3 of that. Will that be enough to live on?

On Disability, most states allow you to work, within your restrictions, up to 20 hours a week. So Disability and part time pay. Will that be enough to live on?

The other thing that might stand against you is your age. It was tough for me getting approved with all my health issues and I was 50.
At your age (they’re also weighing how many years they’ll have to pay out vs how many years you paid in). At your age you might only get a fraction of what you got from working. The odds work more in your favor the more decades you have behind you.
 
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