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When you need to rant...

fuzzygobo

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It is rough.sometimes. Once I was so sick but I was afraid if I went to the hospital I would die there. If I didn't go I definitely would have died.
Hospitals do their best, but nobody wants to be there. You can get lonely, you don't know when you can go home, sometimes you're in a lot of pain, it's not fun.
Last year, I was in the hospital three times, for two weeks each time. But each time I had plenty of visitors, my pastor came every other day, and I had a few decent roommates.
Plus I had my bible and tons of people praying for me. That made all the difference.
I feel bad because a lot of patients have no friends or family, nobody praying for them, which doesn't help you get better. I'm more fortunate than most.
 

D'Snowth

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Oh, why are we even acting like the FCC is even pretending to do its job? They haven't been doing their job for years - with all the garbage they allow on the airwaves, I've contacted them, asking them if it's supposed to be their job to monitor the content that we see on the air, why do they allow so much vulgarity and obscenities on televisions . . . their response was literally denying responsibility, and telling me to take it up with the individual networks.
 

fuzzygobo

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The FCC's biggest crusade in recent years was Howard Stern. In the late 80's/early 90's their mission was to bring him down.
The more they tried, the more outrageous he got, the more fans he picked up, the higher his ratings, the more money his station made.
Now he's on Sirius XM, which is out of the FCC's jurisdiction, he can be as outrageous as he wants to be. Unfortunately he's not funny anymore. It's hard for a 65 year old man to act like a high schooler.
But once upon a time on K Rock, with Howard Stern all morning, classic rock and roll all day, who needed tv? Radio had it all.
Some of the funniest times, was between 1990 and 1996 when Billy West was part of Howard's radio crew (yes, THAT Billy West)
I'm sorry so many of you were too young to enjoy it. Back then Billy was hysterical.
 
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mimitchi33

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Speaking of the FCC those complaints I showed earlier were mostly about ads and not the shows themselves. Don't they know that the cable stations may have placed the ad there and not the channel itself? (This is called local insertion).
 

newsmanfan

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I hope this never happens to any of you. I've dealt with it more times than I can count, but...

If you ever have to go to the hospital, they make you take off your clothes and put on those dreaded hospital gowns. You have to put them on backwards, your legs and back are exposed, and the hospital is always freezing.
Once in a while they'll let me wear sweatpants to cover my legs, but these gowns are worse than useless and ugly as sin.
Hospital beds aren't much better. It's hard to get comfortable when you're hooked up to tubes and wires you look like Frankenstein. At night they don't turn the lights off, and nurses wake you up at all hours to check your. Italy's and whatnot.
Since I was 21, they always put me in a room with some old coot. Nobody my age. Now I'm one of those old coots, and they stick me in a room with an OLDER coot!
And you haven't lived until you stayed in a hospital and there is ALWAYS someone on your floor yelling "Nurse!! Get me out of here!! I'm dying!!!" Day and night.
The only thing that has gotten better is the food. Hospital food used to be a step above jail food, but they made strides in recent years. You're lucky if you get visitors, tv channels and WiFi is sketchy at best, so meals become the highlight of your day.
Hospital stays are rarely pleasant. But I am grateful they keep my alive when I came close to dying. I just hope you stay well, never get some life-threatening disease, never break any bones. But if any friends or family ever end up there, visit them. They appreciate it, and you'll appreciate the fact it's not you in there.
Wow. What hospital is this? What state? I spent most of last July in the hospital (St Elizabeth's in Appleton for a couple days, then airlifted to UW Madison for the rest) and while it wasn't enjoyable, both places tried to make things as comfortable as possible. At UW I had a private room, even when downgraded from the ER to Critical and then to a regular room. Lights off at night, and they let my sweetie set up speakers to play rain noises all night to help me sleep (we do so at home). The nurses and techs who did have to wake me to get readings, samples, etc, were all super nice about it, except for one cranky phlebotomist. Very little noise from outside if the door was closed (though I feel you about the panicked screams from down the hall...that's EVERY hospital ever). Wifi was good, had a tablet in critical care where I or my fam could look up my test results, doctor's notes etc any time of day, food was okayish if bland (again, every hospital ever). Staff were nearly all helpful, intelligent, skilled, and generally wonderful.

Is this an anti-rant? Maybe a Rant In Favor Of. : )

Sorry you had that experience. Hoping if you are able to go to a different hospital for any future illness, you have the best time possible while being sick.
 

fuzzygobo

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Wow. What hospital is this? What state? I spent most of last July in the hospital (St Elizabeth's in Appleton for a couple days, then airlifted to UW Madison for the rest) and while it wasn't enjoyable, both places tried to make things as comfortable as possible. At UW I had a private room, even when downgraded from the ER to Critical and then to a regular room. Lights off at night, and they let my sweetie set up speakers to play rain noises all night to help me sleep (we do so at home). The nurses and techs who did have to wake me to get readings, samples, etc, were all super nice about it, except for one cranky phlebotomist. Very little noise from outside if the door was closed (though I feel you about the panicked screams from down the hall...that's EVERY hospital ever). Wifi was good, had a tablet in critical care where I or my fam could look up my test results, doctor's notes etc any time of day, food was okayish if bland (again, every hospital ever). Staff were nearly all helpful, intelligent, skilled, and generally wonderful.

Is this an anti-rant? Maybe a Rant In Favor Of. : )

Sorry you had that experience. Hoping if you are able to go to a different hospital for any future illness, you have the best time possible while being sick.
I was hospitalized on three different occasions. One for a broken hip, one for retaining fluid in my legs, one for a stroke. The first and last times were at Morristown, NJ, the second was St. Claire's in Denville.
While nobody likes being in there, I made the best of it all three times. Each time there was always one nurse or one tech that really performed above and beyond the call of duty.
The food in Morristown was good, but for some reason they kept bringing me peaches after constantly telling them I won't touch them. Jello, yes. Peaches, no.
Most of the time in Critical Care I had a private room, but the last three days of my last stay, my roommate and I hit it off big time. We spent a lot of time praying together, encouraging each other, laughing, it was great.
But the hospital gowns still have to go.
 
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