The New New Quote Thread

CBPuppets

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ASH: Listen, is that bad guy talk I hear?

DAWN: It speaks to me loud and clear!

ASH: On the wind!

DAWN: Past the stars!

BROCK: In your Ear!

JESSIE: IT'S THAT KIND OF IMITATION THEY INVENTED LAWSUITS FOR!

DAWN: Chill out! We couldn't care less about you!

ASH: We're looking for Spiritomb!

--Pokemon DP Battle Dimension: The Keystone Pops--
 

CBPuppets

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ZANE: You'll never win or lose until you put yourself out there, and that means creating your own deck and your own strategies, not piggy-backing off of someone else's. After all, there is no amount of studying that you can do to be able to use someone else's deck as well as they can.

--Yu-Gi-Oh! GX: The King of Copycats Part 2--
 

antsamthompson9

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Anthony Strand: Robin starts singing Just one Person, and then Scooter, then Bean, then Gonzo, then Fozzie, then everyone. And when I say everyone, I mean everyone. We've only seen the Muppet Show gang in this special, but all the puppeteers who don't have a signature Muppet Show character, get to play a character from another franchise, it's never explained, they're just there, some of that is Caroll Spinney as Big Bird, Marty Robinson as Telly, Pam Aricero as Grundgetta, Fran Brill as Prairie Dawn, Mokey Fraggle is there, guys! We've talked a lot on this podcast, they keep Fraggle Rock sacred. Fraggles don't show up at gatherings. Traveling Matt is traveling outer space, so he can go to Celebration of 30 Years, he can go to Kermit and Piggy's wedding, he can just hang around. Kermit and Robin have to go to Fraggle Rock to meet the others, they don't come to things, they're not part of the gang, but Jim Henson is dead, so you better believe that Kathy Mullen is playing Mokey Fraggle.
Joe Hennes: Jim has passed away so, the Fraggles are like "Oh man, our friends Kermit and Robin who we met at Christmas a couple years ago, they must be really sad, so let's come out of our Fraggle hole and sing this song with everybody." They showed up for the funeral.
Anthony: It's the only thing that could've done it, and it's absolutely heart breaking. The fact that the Fraggles are there makes it even sadder.
Joe: I can barley think of in-continuity examples of the Fraggle Five specifically interacting with anything outside of their world.
Ryan Roe: In the Fraggle Rock Rock On shorts, they use their Doozertubes to speak to celebrities but it was just their voices.
Joe: Did they interact with Ben Folds Five in the Do It Anyway video? I think they kinda pass eachother in the window a little bit, or just showed up behind them while they're playing their instruments or something. But even recently, I interviewed a couple of the Fraggles for ToughPigs when the new Back to the Rock episodes premiered, and there was a deliberate disconnect. They said beforehand, the Fraggles cannot see you, as far as they know, you're another Fraggle, they're just hearing your voice and go. So they got to keep that veil up a bit for their own continuity, so if I can't even do that while I'm promoting their show, for them to do something like this, this is one of the very rare moments they're gonna break that veil.
Ryan: They had to make an expectation. Wow.
 
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antsamthompson9

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Anthony Strand: I said a minute ago that everyone is there, but everyone is not there, because then the door opens and Kermit the Frog comes walking in. And Kermit is played by Steve Whitmire now. Except, tell me what you guys' thoughts are, I don't think he sounds like Steve here. Like I know it's him, I know it to be him, it's a weird thing, he's playing Kermit for the first time.
Joe Hennes: They digitally altered his voice. That's been on public record.
Ryan Roe: But aren't there versions out there of the altered version and the non-altered version?
Joe: So they rerecorded it or I don't know what they did, but both versions are Steve and one of them is digitally altered, but they do sound slightly different. So I don't know which one any of us listened to, but only one of them is just Steve's voice doing Kermit with no effects on it. Isn't that weird?
Anthony: Well, it's especially weird because, he comes in and says "What a good song. I knew you guys could do the tribute for Jim. But do you have something silly to end with?" And if you're like me, that line delivery is burned into your brain. Cause I think about that all the time. And like you say, it's digitally altered, but it's also just strange because, we know what Steve sounds like as Kermit, and this isn't it. So after this very emotional moment, like if Bob Cratchit came strolling in, it'd be one thing, it'd feel more like his debut, but instead it just feels like... I mean, I cannot imagine, your boss and mentor just died, you're taking over his most important character, and you have a handful of lines at the end of the thing. It's not like he really gets to play Kermit here.
Ryan: I remember reading a newspaper article maybe a week before this aired, where they quoted Jane Henson saying that Kermit was gonna continue, there was a different performer that was gonna be playing him, and she said something like, "He won't quite be the same at first, but then little by little, he's gonna get his personality back." So they were preparing people for the fact that Kermit was returning, he's gonna live on, he's not gonna sound exactly the same as you're used to, but still, it must have been so much pressure coming at the end of this special about how important Jim Henson is to then be the new guy. "Okay, here's his most important character, now it's you, go."
Joe: Here's the thing though, I'm just gonna say it, cause I'm sure everyone who watches this thinks it, people definitely thought this back in 1990, but man you hear that for the first time, especially after having just celebrated Jim and heard Kermit's voice over and over again in these clips, it sounds awful. And it has nothing to do with Steve's performance. Because Steve's Kermit later sounds different. And I can differentiate between Jim's Kermit, Steve's Kermit, Matt's Kermit, like these are different versions of the same character played by 3 different human beings. This one's got that weird robotic lilt to it, it doesn't feel like Kermit's personality yet, it's only a couple lines, but like the Muppets were just mourning someone 2 seconds ago and now Kermit's just kinda like "Oh good, I'm glad all my friends are having a good time". It's like who's this guy? He's very Micky Mouse. And in that moment when he's teasing there's more Muppet stuff to come, don't worry, it's like do we want that if this is what it's gonna be like?
Anthony: Did you feel that way when you were 8 years old? You didn't.
Joe: Yes I did, because we knew this was gonna end with this is the new Kermit, this is what we're gonna expect from now on. But it's like we don't want it, we don't like it. And here's the thing: This is the young human being in me saying this, because what I didn't know was you need to give it a few years, you need to let him get into the role, you need to get used to it, you need some really fun productions, and then you'll get used to it, more importantly, he'll get used to it, and then that'll be Kermit and that's that, and that's fine. But in that moment, there doesn't feel like there's a whole lot of confidence behind don't worry, it's the same old Kermit. Like you don't get any of that in this moment. It's just a scary thing for the future of the franchise when you know nothing about it.
Ryan: It's not this is the same old Kermit, it's here's a little glimpse of Kermit to remind you that Kermit's gonna continue. That's the message to us, is that the Muppets are gonna keep on going.
Joe: I'm gonna throw this scenario out to you which I'm very grateful didn't happen, if they replaced Kermit with a Mickey Moused version and this was the first glimpse of that, and we ended up getting someone who's very much watered down, very kid-friendly, and not representing the Kermit we all love in any way, then we would be looking at this moment as being like, we should've known in that second that this was not gonna end well. Not knowing what it was gonna be, and this is all we have for the next 2 years until MCC, cause we really didn't get much of Kermit between those 2, then that's just our assumption until we're proven wrong.
Anthony: Right, but let me say this, from the year 2022, the fact that MCC is the next thing, and Kermit's not playing himself, he's playing beloved literary character Bob Cratchit, a character played by the likes of Gene Lockhart and David Warner in the past, he's standing in the footsteps of giants, Steve is so good as Kermit in that movie. And I think it's because he has such solid material to work with, he doesn't have to try to reinvent Kermit, he gets to be Bob Cratchit, he gets to be a little Wembley-ish, frankly, at times, and I think that that helped him so much.
Ryan: Yeah, it's a transition.
Joe: Oh, I completely agree.
Anthony: I think that might be what stopped what you're saying from happening.
Joe: I think you're right. But the fact that he goes kinda straight from MCC to MTI where Steve does not get to play Kermit as Kermit for years after taking over this character until MT, and even then, it was just like once in awhile, he needed that practice. And I'm also saying all this to talk a little bit about Matt Vogel's Kermit, and a lot of people having that negative reaction to the new Kermit of like this is not good. I personally didn't think that, but a lot of people did and that's okay. But we need to give these things time, to let them find the character, and then we will get used to it, and the character will be back again, and it will be a little bit different and that's okay. But I don't know what they coulda done to give us that confidence right off the bat. That's an impossible task.
Ryan: Well, especially not in the last 45 seconds of this special.
Anthony: Although, weirdly Steve in this special, the 5 lines, that's how many lines Matt has had in 5 years.
Ryan: Just about.
Joe: Yeah, that's tough too. They need a new movie or TV show or whatever to let these guys play and neither of them got that at the beginning of their career as Kermit.
Anthony: I mean we can talk about this another time, but like, MN, Kermit's barely in it, MHM, Kermit's barley in it. The stuff that they have done, he's not doing much, unlike MCC, where he gets a big song, in the first 15 minutes.
Joe: But like you said, he doesn't get to be himself in MCC. Like both of these guys have to go years before they're gonna get that chance to really play. It's just tough, and I have very vivid memories of watching this for the first time and not feeling that confidence. I just felt like it was worth mentioning because a lotta people probably felt the same way.
Ryan: So I would not go as far as to say that he sounds bad here, but he definitely just sounds different. We talked about this a lot on our website, our forum, social media, that if there had been Twitter when this special aired, people would've been so up in arms about "How dare this new person think that he can play Kermit?" But it's the same kinda situation, he just sounds different, and he's gonna adjust the voice a little bit, and eventually people will get used to it, and that's what's happening now.
Joe: I mean, the one thing that I disagree slightly with what you said is the fact that they felt the need to add that robotic sounding course correction for the voice which made it sound artificial. And like the new guy doesn't have the voice right, so we have to digitally change it later on. That kinda felt like a vote of no confidence from behind the scenes a little bit. And thank goodness as far as I know, this is the only time they ever did that. But you know what's interesting too? When Kevin Clash left SS, I couldn't even tell you what productions, there's a couple of productions where they needed someone to do the voice of Elmo, before Ryan Dillon was cast as Elmo officially, and it's other performers doing it and they had to digitally change it. Cause they were kinda on a time crunch to get Elmo content out there, and nobody was doing the perfect Elmo voice just yet. So to find those things and to hear them you go "Man, the audio's a little uncanny valley, like it just doesn't sound right." And it's not because it's a different person doing it, it's because it sounds like it's been digitally altered.
Ryan: So do you think we would find this less weird if they hadn't digitally altered it, if it was just the new guy doing his best attempt at a Kermit voice and maybe it doesn't sound like the Kermit we're used to, but it still sounds like a person rather than a digitally altered person?
Joe: I mean it definitely would have sounded weird because it's different and it's the first time a character had really been recast in Muppet canon at that point, with the exception of Miss Piggy from the beginning of TMS which doesn't really count.
Ryan: The first major recast.
Anthony: You guys, justice for Snuffleupagus, guys.
Ryan: Yeah, I was sitting here going through my head like maybe there was another. But yes, you're right.
Joe: Yeah, Telly, Grundgetta, all those guys. But I think looking back at it, if it had not been digitally altered at all, then I might not have been triggered to have these memories as much because, it would sound like Steve's Kermit. But it doesn't sound like Steve's Kermit or Jim's Kermit because of that.
Ryan: Right, it's some other thing.
 
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antsamthompson9

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Frank Oz: Jim was such an amazing person that he was always supportive of me even though he was loosing me to directing. But there was a time there where I was both directing and performing. And then as I did more movies, I didn't screw up, and they kept on asking me cause I didn't screw up, I did more. And that's the reason why I couldn't do SS as much, partly because, I had 4 kids growing up, but also, I was directing, and I had no choice but to give up my characters. It wasn't fair to say, "Nope, I'm holding onto them, that's it." It wasn't right. I haven't quit, I haven't retired from performing, I just haven't been asked. But Eric and those guys have been doing a brilliant job, and I always say that Eric is so talented, he really should have characters of his own, it's not fair to him. But nevertheless, I would not have had as much time, because you commit to a movie for a long time, and you pretty much work incessantly.
Jarrod Fairclough: You obviously haven't performed for awhile, you said you haven't been asked, if you got a phone call from Sesame tomorrow saying "Hey, are you free for a week?" Would you jump back or would you have to think about it?
Frank: No, I would like that very much. As I stopped I was doing 2 days a year on SS, and I couldn't do a lot more than that, 4 days tops, because I was doing many other things. But the reason I'd go back is to let people know what I learned from Jim, which was this sense of controlled lunacy, which I don't sense anymore. The reason I'd like to go back is just to show people "Hey, this is how Jim did it, this is how we did it, and it's okay to do it for yourself, cause you're an adult, and just to have fun and screw around." That's the reason I'd love to go back, is to bring back a bit of that lunacy that Jim taught us.
Jarrod: There seems to be some false narrative out there, occasionally you'll see a headline that says "Frank Oz thinks the Muppets suck now" or something like that. And you go "No, that's not what he said." And if you read through what you actually said in the article, it's just a quick quote or something taken out of context. So let's set the record straight, you don't think the Muppets suck.
Frank Oz: No. Now that was years ago, now the Muppets Studio these days is much better, and they're much more supportive. I talked to Billy and the guys and they had a great time doing the Dr. Teeth Mayhem thing. So I'm looking forward to seeing that. What I was talking about was before the current iteration of Muppets Studio, at that time, the guys I felt were not treated properly, with respect, and I felt, as they did, the writing was trying to be adult and hip, when all they had to do was be pure. And it's very difficult for people to write pure when supposedly they have to be funny and adult. And people don't understand that the best way for the Muppets to be adult and hip is to be pure. So that was then, I felt it was very bad. But the Muppets themselves, no, and the performers, no, it was always the orders given that they had to do it this way, that's what bothered me.
Jarrod: Yeah, I think Leigh Slaughter who runs the Muppets now, she really has an idea of what should be done.
Frank: Leigh is terrific, and I forgot the other fellow's name, I met him.
Jarrod: Michael.
Frank: Yeah, they're people who actually care. In the beginning, earlier on, they didn't care. It was just a franchise. That upset me, because the Muppets are in my heart and these guys are such amazing performers and they're so ****ing brilliant, and they were not treated with that respect. Now it's different.
Jarrod: Is there something that you didn't work on in the last 20 years or so that you feel got close to what they should have been doing?
Frank: I remember, early on, there were some videos that they did. I remember there was a very popular video on YT.
Jarrod: Bohemian Rhapsody?
Frank: Yeah, that was fun.
 

antsamthompson9

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Sam Schultz: You know what we didn't talk about at all? Elmo's big week.
Matt Gaydos: Yeah, this was the week of Elmo in the news. It started off you thought with maybe the biggest Elmo news in awhile, since Rocco, probably, where he just tweeted "Hey, how's everybody doing out there?"
Sam: And everyone said, "Really bad!"
Matt: "It sucks out here, Elmo!" I'm sure part of this had to be planned, because I'm sure all this can't come together too fast, but, kudos to the Sesame social team for turning this into a mental health discussion. Good job, but as a part of that campaign, they went on the Today Show, to have Elmo and his dad talk about mental health and talk about how we should be better and take time to talk about your feelings. And it turned out that that annoyed one man who had to sit there the whole time and listen to Elmo talk about his feelings. And that man was Larry David, who decided to cross the set unprompted, and grab Elmo's face.
Sam: Smoosh Elmo's face up.
Matt: And take a swing at him again, and just walk away and everyone on set was appalled. Most people on the internet also appalled. It doesn't seem entirely out of character for Larry, but also is wild that anyone would beat up a Sesame Muppet.
Sam: I can't even wrap my head around it honestly, cause what you're doing is grabbing a man's hand.
Matt: I almost wish there was a moment where he walked behind the couch, saw Ryan Dillon, and went "I made a mistake."
Sam: "Oh, you're a person. Sorry".
Matt: But I think instead, what's worse, is I think Larry walks around the couch, sees Ryan, and judges that person. I think Larry goes " What are you doing with your life, man who's making Elmo talk about mental health?" Because even in his "apologies" that he's done afterwards, he basically says "I couldn't take it. Having that annoying voice, that puppet talk about mental health to me was too annoying, I had to do something". And it's like you really, really didn't.
Sam: It was shocking. It's kinda hard to watch for me, cause it's so awkward. And when he "apologizes" later in that same clip, he looks grief-stricken kinda.
Matt: He looks like NBC gave him a talking to. "If you want us to talk about your show, you're gonna have to apologize, otherwise we're gonna remove you from the studio."
Sam: Elmo sounds as close as I heard Elmo breaking character and being like "Hey, **** you man!"
Matt: And Louie, his dad, threatens to sue Larry for assault!
Sam: And I'm sure that Sesame probably has also thought about the same thing.
 

antsamthompson9

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Mathew Gaydos: I'm sure there's a certain thrill, excitement, fun when you have rules in your head when you're performing a character like Elmo, of like "OK, we're improving right now, but I have to stay in this box, I am this old, I can say these things, I know these words." I'm sure that's exciting and sometimes maybe a little... Is it scary? Do you ever get nervous doing that?
Ryan Dillon: No, but I often find myself doing things that are probably more indulgent than the character would allow for, because it is limiting. It's very limiting to play a 3-and-a-half year old on a late-night talk show because, that is an odd scenario. So you do have to bend the rules a little bit. I always feel like the ages, from a curricular perspective, it's really important to have an age to write to for the show, but I always feel like, we don't know how old Ernie and Bert are, and we don't really care, we don't really know how old Grover is, and we don't really care, I don't anyway, so for me, all the characters are child-like, but not children, they have an innocence and a childish wonder about them, but they're not babies, cause when you make them babies, it makes it really hard to make them funny.
Sam Schultz: They're like really smart cats or dogs or something.
Ryan: Yeah, they're wise but they're also really stupid.
Matthew: Through the years, I feel like I've seen a number of clips of specifically you performing Elmo on Jimmy Fallon, where you can catch him off-guard with something, in a way where he's like "Did Elmo just say balsamic vinegar?"
Ryan: Yes, we just had it the other day. I played Password. And I've been dying to play Password, cause we were supposed to do it before Covid, and I love game shows, I'm a total freak for that stuff, so I couldn't wait to play. And what's really hard in that game... I was playing for keeps. Like "I am playing this game, I'm gonna win this game." And so crazy things come out, like Elmo guesses satchel. And that was not Elmo guessing satchel, OK? That was Ryan Dillon guessing satchel. But there's a forgiveness because, it's already really complicated and complex to mentally wrap yourself around playing a character in that context who's meant to be younger, but then to be playing a game with an adult in that context... Cause we also had to do this thing where Elmo can't read, so Higgins had to whisper the clues. But I also love the dichotomy of a character who can't read but happens to know what satchel is. You know what I mean? There's this kinda duality.
Matthew: You also have the moment where Higgins is whispering to Elmo not to you.
Ryan: Yes, and I should say by the way, we were playing that game for real. I was looking up to see if I could get the whispering, I couldn't see what he was whispering. And sometimes I could see the card he was holding, and sometimes I couldn't see the card he was holding. So it was really like we were playing the game. But I love those moments. I think there's some forgiveness in those moments, just like with Jim and Frank, when they would do these shows, they kinda steer, cause you're also playing for a different audience, you're playing for the adults, you're not doing it for the kids. So those things are always fun.
Sam: Muppets on talk shows, a beautiful, beautiful thing.
Ryan: I agree.
Sam: Should happen all the time.
Ryan: It should.
 
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