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Oscar acting out of Character?

RedPiggy

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GrouchFanatic said:
Aside from him sharing his trash can w/ Rizzo the Rat since he never had a rat in his trash can before I saw no other parts where Oscar was actin outta character.
I don't see how that's out of character. Though WE know Rizzo is a cute little critter ... Oscar knows that most people see rats as disgusting disease-carrying vermin. THAT'S why he becomes curious about bunking with Rizzo -- only Oscar (or Gonzo) would give a character with that kind or reputation a chance.
 

MJTaylor

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I remember one time when Oscar really acted out of charcter. It happened when Maria's waters broke and she had to go to hospital to give birth to Gabby. Oscar drove her there and then when the baby was born he thought she was cute. (At least I think that's what happened, I can't remember for sure.)
Mind you, later on he felt uncomftable about being so nice and Luis consoled him, saying he would be grouchy again later. That's what happened when he returned to the Street. Everyone else asked him what had happened and he wouldn't tell them. Bob went as far as to say that was the grouchiest thing he'd ever done.
 

Ilikemuppets

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I know he was uncomfortable with not seeming like himself on that episode. But i think it is in his character to be nice when nobody is looking. Heh-heh!:grouchy:
 

GrouchFanatic

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Oh yeah! I forgot about that! Oscar did seem very out of character then but he got over it!:grouchy: heh-heh-heh!
 

BEAR

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Oscar is a very complex character. A lot more depth than we realize.:grouchy:
 

ISNorden

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Oscar does keep his less-grouchy side a secret, and he's usually picky about who gets to see it. He shows obvious affection for Slimey in some of the Trash Gordon endings, but tells the audience "You didn't see that..." at the same time. Thanks to a montage in the 25th-anniversary special, I've even seen Oscar comforting a pajama-clad Elmo with a long hug. (He even said "Huggity hug hug hug..." *LOL*) Since I haven't found that scene anywhere else, I wonder which episode/special showed Oscar and Elmo like that?
 

Skekayuk

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It's an interesting point in developing a well rounded convincing believable character. Would Oscar actually be that convincing if he didn't occassionally show a less grouchy side?
For a character, even a nasty one to work, there has to be something that drives them, that motivates them. And sometimes they need to have feelings too, or else they are not convincing.
Yes you can have out and out villians and such like, motivated by power, or lust, or sometimes the delusional conviction that their way is right. But sometimes there is a danger these characters can be two-dimensional.

Her's an example, last February, I saw a fringe musical, 'Next Door's Baby', twice. The central character Mrs O'Brien came across the first time as quite heartless towards her family, terribly severe with very little in the way of any feelings for anyone. It was not exactly convincing (even if it had been closely based on the script writer Bernie Gaughan's relative), and yet this character was the lead, so it not being convincing had a knock on effect on the drama. The second time I saw the show, the actress had sofened the character during the first act, only really bringing the harshness in later once the audience had warmed to the character. It worked buch better.
 
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