Little things we've noticed

YellowYahooey

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I remember seeing the song segment "Ridin' on the Train" on an episode that was on YouTube (one of the episodes in the Season 7 snow saga). The film footage seems familiar. I could have sworn I remember seeing the same film footage in a similarly-themed Canadian song segment, "Going on a Train (Going, Going)", which was aired on Canadian Sesame Street until the changeover to Sesame Park. I do remember catching a glimpse of such Canadian song segment on an episode from 1994 which aired on CBC in the summer of 1995. However, I don't remember the details of the episode, not even the sponsors.

Is it possible that some Canadian song segments and other Canadian segments used film footage from the U.S. and replaced the song produced in the U.S. with a completely different track produced in Canada? If so, then it's possibly a low-cost production of such segment.

I do believe Canadian Sesame Street discontinued airing film segments with Joe Raposo background music by 1981 (I definitely saw some when CBC aired Season 10 episodes) , when the amount of Canadian content was expanded to 30 minutes in total. I believe they also didn't air any episodes which had street scenes where Spanish words were spoken, or referenced U.S. history or culture. Though I did read one time that the U.S. cast had to pronounce the last letter of the alphabet as "zed" for Canadian broadcasts. However, I wonder how the CBC handled episodes with Rosita in street scenes?

I wonder if the changeover to Sesame Park was more a low-budget, primarily Canadian version for the CBC?
 
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minor muppetz

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I guess with Ernie and Bert Sing-Along, since it was a record first, and we could only hear what was going on, we were supposed to think that the bathroom was small and it was really crowded, which explains why whenever one of the adults actually acknowledges Bert's request for a towel, they say that there's too many people in the way. But I saw images from episode 900 before I heard the album, and when it was done on the show, they had to use a much bigger bathroom set, with plenty of room for the actors and performers, making me wonder how it could be that crowded. And the album was inspired by the stateroom scene from A Night at the Opera, where everyone is crammed into a small room.

With it originating as audio, we were supposed to use our imaginations to know how small or crowded or absurd it was, but as I had already seen photos of what the adaptation was like, I just thought the room was too big and not crowded enough to imagine it being such a small space.
 

minor muppetz

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In episode 2042, when Oscar and Grundgetta dress in a Snuffleupagus to fool Gordon, Grundgetta gets on top and does the voice, though I think it would make more sense for Oscar to do the voice.

In the 40th anniversary book, Pam Arciero’s first audition for Sesame Street was to perform Mr. Snuffleupagus.

Do you think this might have been an inside joke?
 

TimzUneeverse

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In some episodes that have any of the sorting songs ("OoTT," "ToTT," and "HAST,") the person who plays and/or sings sometimes holds on to the board containing the subjects used for the round (for example, Luis in this particular variant of "HAST" in show 442).

I'm pretty sure Gordon did the same to the game board in show 960 (with his arm extended out), and in show 914.
 
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clipjj27

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I remember seeing the song segment "Ridin' on the Train" on an episode that was on YouTube (one of the episodes in the Season 7 snow saga). The film footage seems familiar. I could have sworn I remember seeing the same film footage in a similarly-themed Canadian song segment, "Going on a Train (Going, Going)", which was aired on Canadian Sesame Street until the changeover to Sesame Park. I do remember catching a glimpse of such Canadian song segment on an episode from 1994 which aired on CBC in the summer of 1995. However, I don't remember the details of the episode, not even the sponsors.

Is it possible that some Canadian song segments and other Canadian segments used film footage from the U.S. and replaced the song produced in the U.S. with a completely different track produced in Canada? If so, then it's possibly a low-cost production of such segment.

I do believe Canadian Sesame Street discontinued airing film segments with Joe Raposo background music by 1981 (I definitely saw some when CBC aired Season 10 episodes) , when the amount of Canadian content was expanded to 30 minutes in total. I believe they also didn't air any episodes which had street scenes where Spanish words were spoken, or referenced U.S. history or culture. Though I did read one time that the U.S. cast had to pronounce the last letter of the alphabet as "zed" for Canadian broadcasts. However, I wonder how the CBC handled episodes with Rosita in street scenes?

I wonder if the changeover to Sesame Park was more a low-budget, primarily Canadian version for the CBC?
Hi, YellowYahooey:

If you're referring to the segment from Episode 0593 (Season 5) which is on YouTube (and released on HBO Max about a year ago today), then I remember that segment fondly as well! However, as to whether it was 'modified' or 'reworded' into a Candian segment, I'm not sure. I used to watch Sesame Street on CBC as well as a youngster and do remember some of the characteristics you mentioned (like using French, not using Spanish, and referring to the last letter of the alphabet as 'zed'), but as for the specific segment you mentioned, I'm not sure. Then again, if this modification took place around the early 1980's or later, then chances are I would not remember it, since I stopped watching the show regularly around 1981. Sorry I couldn't help you more on this one.
 

LittleJerry92

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To be honest, the ending to the music video of “Your Love” by The Outfield was how I initially remembered the ending to “Wet Paint” before seeing it again on YouTube for the first time in August 2006 in that really lousy camera upload (but it was still a long waited reward to finally get over my fear at that time; it makes me wish I had the Count It Higher VHS if it meant getting more familiar and used to the video):


Basically just orange paint oozing down the lens like that but actually covering up the screen more quickly. To be honest if I didn’t know what year this song came out, I would have guessed this video had some inspiration to it with the effects, but I’m 99% more convinced the music video for “Freeze Frame” by the J. Geils band had big influence on the video (with all the crazy paint splashing at the end eventually covering the lens):

 
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DatH

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Noticed in the top left Bert is pigeon watching. The Two Headed Monster also is seen in the window to the right
 

minor muppetz

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Season 30 is the first to reduce the number of episodes each season from 130 to 65. Seems with the addition of Elmo’s World, they were unable to repeat street stories, though I think they could have still down that in seasons 30 and 31, just have fewer inserts between some of the street scenes.

But now I wonder if them not repeating street scenes from seasons 28 and 29 had more to do with the elimination of Around the Corner and most of the cast associated with that location (as well as replacing Mr. Handford with Alan). Even though season 30 did run some old inserts that take place around the corner and episodes from season 29 were rerun at some points in 1999 (they just didn’t change the episode numbers or replace the opening/closing, though they did replace some inserts).

After all, season 4 and 5 street scenes with Hal Miller as Gordon were not shown in seasons 6 and 7, season 13 and 14 scenes with Mr. Hooper were not repeated in seasons 15 and 16, and season 15 and 16 street scenes concerning Snuffy’s “imaginary” status were not repeated in seasons 17 and 18. Now showing around the corner scenes in seasons 30 and 31 might not be that big a deal, but I guess it’s possible. Aside from Olivia (and anyone let go in season 46), how many cast members were in street stories that got repeated two seasons after they departed?
 
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