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Does anybody think you're weird for watching Sesame Street?

Redsonga

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I've got kids, so at least I have an excuse.
It's not the sort of thing you should need an excuse for though. I am a single girl with no baby and I watch it nearly everyday. It just makes me happy and is a great depression killer :smile:
 

Telly

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I think people would think that I was strange for watching Sesame Street if I wasn't a Muppet freak. The common person doesn't know the difference between Gonzo and Big Bird. To them, they were on the same show. I was talking to my manager about the Old School sets. I told her nothing makes me happier than sitting on the couch, eatting Spaghetti-Ohs, drinking chocolate milk, and watching some old school Sesame Street. Just like when I was 5. :super:
 

CensoredAlso

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nothing makes me happier than sitting on the couch, eatting Spaghetti-Ohs, drinking chocolate milk, and watching some old school Sesame Street. Just like when I was 5. :super:
Ahhhh, almost paradise, hehe. :wisdom:
 

Soul H

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Well, my older brothers thought I was kinda crazy for watching Sesame Street. But when they heard about my disability they understood why I liked watching it.
 

Mokeystar

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No, because anyone who knows me knows that I've been a huge Muppet and Sesame fan since I was a kid. There was a time when I felt embarrased by people's reactions, around the time I was in my late childhood years. But once I became a teenager and found a friend who secretly loved Sesame as much as I did, we both embraced our differences and considered ourselves pretty rebellious but cool for liking Sesame. Now, I could care less what anyone thinks. I don't watch Sesame Street now like I did in the 70s and 80s, but I still wear my Cookie Monster shirt with pride! :smile: Love me, love my Sesame.
 

frogboy4

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I can see people thinking that a grown man watching Sesame Street on a REGULAR BASIS would be frickin' weird.

I've got kids, so at least I have an excuse.

And plus, if you're interested in the craft of puppetry, then that's a good reason too. Look at Stephanie D'abruzzo....she watched in college and eventually got a job on the show.
Say wah? It's funny what taboos stick and which ones don't. With that same mentality grown men watching football wearing a particular player's number and waving a foam finger is friggin' weird, juvenile and not all that masculine when seen through my eyes. But hey - to each his, her or whatever's own. :concern:

I've never had much criticism in my adult life for my particular tastes. As a rather skinny pale dude you’d think otherwise, but it hasn’t been a factor here in San Francisco, Houston or New York. It's the people who would care or condemn what I like that seen to have the most problems. In my experience those who claim distaste for Muppets or cartoons are generally unhappy people without many friends. Joy and laugher are my antidepressants and I use them everyday. But, whatever works for them as long as it doesn’t bring gloom to my doorway. :grouchy: My world tends to be more colorful than most and many times that color takes on a Muppety hue.

"Keep your eyes on your own paper and your hands to yourself," are lessons I learned in kindergarten that seem appropriate here. I think more people (1 through 101, with and without kids) should be watching Sesame Street for its message of tolerance. :wisdom:

(suddenly very glad to have made the Big Bird smilie)​
 

CensoredAlso

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No, because anyone who knows me knows that I've been a huge Muppet and Sesame fan since I was a kid. There was a time when I felt embarrased by people's reactions, around the time I was in my late childhood years. But once I became a teenager and found a friend who secretly loved Sesame as much as I did, we both embraced our differences and considered ourselves pretty rebellious but cool for liking Sesame. Now, I could care less what anyone thinks. I don't watch Sesame Street now like I did in the 70s and 80s, but I still wear my Cookie Monster shirt with pride! :smile: Love me, love my Sesame.
That's true, as the Count will tell you, there's strength in numbers! Ah, ah, ah! :batty:
 

ssetta

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I can see people thinking that a grown man watching Sesame Street on a REGULAR BASIS would be frickin' weird.

I've got kids, so at least I have an excuse.

And plus, if you're interested in the craft of puppetry, then that's a good reason too. Look at Stephanie D'abruzzo....she watched in college and eventually got a job on the show.
Okay, I have to say I'm a little against the first part of what you said. If you feel that way, then why are you here? I have dealt with a lot of people who have said that, and I don't have any respect for them at all. This is a message board for people who love Sesame Street.

And as for the second part, that is absolutely, very true. But there's a lot more about Sesame Street to love than just the puppets. My favorite part of the show was always the music. The show's musicians are very talented.
 

CensoredAlso

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The thing is, we're not always going to have the same tastes and the same interests. We may even actively dislike something someone else likes. But it's important to just let it go to a certain extent and respect people, even when they don't agree with you (whether they like Sesame Street, or even if they don't). We just need to do our own thing; it's not worth it judging or resenting people. :smile:
 

ssetta

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Actually, I just realized something. Okay, I'm a member of this message board called Radio-Info.com. It's for fans of radio and TV. I mostly post in the TV section. And it just so happens, that out of all the TV networks, PBS is usually the one that's talked about the least. I think the reason for this is, well, first of all, PBS isn't really a "network." This is because unlike the major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, etc.), each PBS station has its own schedule for most of the day. And unlike PBS, the main network affiliates are always changing their news images and music packages, so therefore, there isn't really that much about PBS to talk about. A lot of people think of PBS as "boring."

Another way that PBS is different is that they cater to a slightly different audience than most of the networks. You see, PBS is often considered to be "Viewer-supported." That is, PBS stations get most of their money from the viewers themselves. Though they do make money that way, they cannot possibly make as much money as commercial stations, which get their money from all their advertisers.

So, anyway, as most of you may know, PBS happens to be the "network" that Sesame Street has been on for all the 38 years that it has been on the air. And I think that MAY be one of the reasons why it's labelled a "baby show." Because a lot of other kids shows on real networks like Nick Jr. and Playhouse Disney aren't labelled as being for babies as much. And what's funny is, even though a lot of the shows (Blue's Clues, Dora the Explorer, JoJo's Circus (not our JoJo, the other one lol), etc.) are designed for the same target age group as Sesame Street, a lot of people associate them as being for older kids. And for awhile, Noggin actually DID have episodes of Sesame Street from the 1993-94 season, along with older Nickelodeon shows like Blue's Clues, Gullah Gullah Island, Eureeka's Castle, and Allegra's Window. And if you can believe it, Sesame Street is the ONLY preschool show from PBS that was ever on Noggin. And so it was kinda cool seeing it bunched in with all those Nickelodeon shows, and there was thought that MAYBE it would appeal to older kids since it was with all of them. And the show was WAY better in 1993-94 than it is now. They must have had about 50 different characters, great music, and it was all crazy and wild. So, they thought that was the place for it. But apparently, nobody watched it, and it got taken off.
 
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