1. Welcome to the Muppet Central Forum!
    You are viewing our forum as a guest. Join our free community to post topics and start private conversations. Please contact us if you need help with registration or your account login.

  2. "Muppets Most Wanted" Fan Reactions
    After you see "Muppets Most Wanted", read fan reactions and let us know your thoughts on the Muppets eighth theatrical film.

  3. "Muppets Most Wanted" Original Soundtrack
    With a new Muppet movie one of the most anticipated merchandise releases is the official soundtrack. Listen to the Muppets Most Wanted original soundtrack now playing on Muppet Central Radio.

Difference Between Puppets and Muppets?

Discussion in 'Puppet News' started by pojksd, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. pojksd New Member

    what is the difference between puppet and muppet?
    Only lines?
  2. Hubert Well-Known Member

    I'm not quite sure what you mean there...could you explain further?
  3. FrackleFan2012 Well-Known Member

  4. NextJim1225 Member

    In truth, there's actually not a difference. The Muppets are really a brand and style of puppetry started by Jim that are pretty much world renowned. The Muppets have people behind them to bring them to life, just as any puppet, who have the ability to make us feel empathy for them and learn a great life lesson in the end. One other aspect that sets them apart is that Jim actually came up for his puppet troupe, really for brand recognition.
  5. pojksd New Member

    Thanks for the answers, really appreciated:)
  6. dwmckim Well-Known Member

    Puppets are things you put on your hands and play with.

    Muppets are real.

    (At least that was my definition when i was a kid and i'm sticking with it)
  7. Buck-Beaver Active Member

    All Muppets are puppets, but not all puppets are Muppets. :D
  8. snichols1973 Well-Known Member

    If it can be associated with mainstream franchises (Sesame Street, movies featuring characters from TMS, Muppets Tonight, Fraggle Rock, The Jim Henson Hour, etc.), and it involves iconic stock characters we know and love (including second-generation characters such as Pepe the King Prawn, Bobo the Bear, Johnny Fiama, Sal Minella, Clifford, etc., who got their start on MT, etc.), or even characters from films such as The Muppets Take Manhattan (Bill, Gil & Jill from the ad agency), etc., and they can be identified as a definitive, trademarked property of the Jim Henson Co., it's a Muppet.

    However, even if it's created by someone who at the time wasn't part of the JHC (e.g., Tom Patchett co-scripted TMTM and TGMC, but other works such as Alf [the original sitcom was not a JHC production, but produced by a distinctly separate company, Alien Productions in this case], or if it has no connections whatsoever to the JHC (Howdy Doody, Jeff Dunham, etc.) or it looks like a sock on a hand, a ventriloquist's dummy, or something that's so generic, it doesn't even bear a remote resemblance to something the JHC would create (including amateur settings such as children's church, etc.), it's a puppet.

    As for Yoda, even though he was operated and voiced by Frank Oz, the development took place as part of LucasFilm Studios, not the JHC.

    Even Frank Oz had some occasional non-Muppet cameo roles, such as a corrections officer in The Blues Brothers, and other films involving such first-generation SNL alumni such as Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, Steve Martin, etc., and directorial collaborations with other studios....

Share This Page

Visit the Sesame Street Store Today!