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You Ever Notice...and What's the Deal...

D'Snowth

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So I've noticed these financial and economical publications have pretty much stopped publishing their annual reports and statistics of how much mothers would be earning in terms of salaries if they actually got paid for all they do all year such as cooking, cleaning, caring for the children, among other things.

Because I used to think every year, if they can actually take the time to figure all of those numbers out, why can't they figure out a way to actually make it happen and actually let mothers get paid . . . guess they figured it was a lost cause.
 

fuzzygobo

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Well, unfortunately motherhood is not a paid position. What happens if you sleep in late?
If you're an abusive mother, how come you don't get fired?

If yore a mother (probably a hundred million or so) how long do yo get paid? Until the kid is 18? 21? Forever?
What if you become a grandmother? Do you get a raise because your family gets extended by a generation?

What if you're the Octomom? Or a Mormon? You'd bankrupt the system.

Or, how much did your dad pay your mom to raise you?

That study seems to reach a dead end because you can't put a tangible price on motherhood.

The best thing you can do tomorrow (if you're broke and can't even afford a card, let alone candy or flowers) is say Thank you Mom, for everything and tell how much you love her.
Love is free, but priceless.

Happy Mother's Day to all moms near and far.
 
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D'Snowth

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So I recently realized something about the new(er) SS set that actually doesn't seem to have gotten just a whole lot of mileage: David Gallo had explained there were various different cans or recycling bins throughout the street for Oscar to pop out of at random so he can get in on whatever action is happening in any part of the street, such as the community center, or Abby's garden - basically implying that Oscar's got tunnels all under the street.

That concept doesn't seem like it's gotten much at all . . . like, I think I can count on just one hand - and still have fingers left over - all the times since the new set was introduced I can remember Oscar just popping up out of a random can or bin.
 

minor muppetz

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So I recently realized something about the new(er) SS set that actually doesn't seem to have gotten just a whole lot of mileage: David Gallo had explained there were various different cans or recycling bins throughout the street for Oscar to pop out of at random so he can get in on whatever action is happening in any part of the street, such as the community center, or Abby's garden - basically implying that Oscar's got tunnels all under the street.

That concept doesn't seem like it's gotten much at all . . . like, I think I can count on just one hand - and still have fingers left over - all the times since the new set was introduced I can remember Oscar just popping up out of a random can or bin.
In that recent "Device Free Dinner" video, Oscar goes down into his bin and then pops up from in front. Was there a hidden trash can there?
 

D'Snowth

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It seems to me that the Brits aren't very good at coming up with baby names, because from my observation, a lot of them have the same names. For instance, a lot of British men are named Simon or Colin, while a lot of British women are named Emma or Emily.

Though, to be fair, this could be the British equivilent of how certain names are really popular in America, like John or Sarah.
 

D'Snowth

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I'm gonna pull a minor muppetz here and go into an observation I've made from the movie RATATOUILLE:

Colette jumps to Linguini's defense when Skinner threatens to fire him over messing with the soup, on the grounds that firing the person responsible for making something a critic enjoyed would look bad for Gusteau's restaurant (which has been struggling since Gusteau's death); Skinner reluctantly decides not to fire Linguini after all, and also decides to put Colette in charge of him since she defended him.

After Remy spends some time "training" Linguini in a kitchen setting and is able to recreate the soup he "accidentally" made, Skinner decides to put Colette in charge of him in terms of furthering his training in the kitchen, which angers her because she feels she's worked too long and too hard to build up her own reputation as Gusteau's new (first and only woman) Sous-chef to have to take on the task of training "some garbage boy who got lucky."

So not only does it seem like Skinner had forgotten that he already put Colette in charge of Linguini in the kitchen, but it also seems like Colette forgot she defended and stood up for him when Skinner was initially firing him, when even she was impressed that it seemed a mere garbage boy could make something delicious by accident.
 

minor muppetz

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In one episode of That '70s Show, Jackie gets Kelso a leather jacket, but everyone - or at least Hyde, Fez, and Laurie - teases him about being Fonzie. But what's up with that? Fonzie was popular in the late-1970s, why tease somebody for dressing up like him? And why should Kelso be embarrassed by it (aside from them teasing him)?

I also wonder what is up with the later scene where Kelso stops wearing it, Fez starts wearing it, and everyone who made fun of Kelso for it treats Fez with respect. But I guess it's not important (they might have been arranging for Kelso to want to wear it again so they could make fun of him more).
 

D'Snowth

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I was listening to an interview with Martin Scorsese, and his thoughts on the digital era of filmmaking that we now live in, and one of his biggest problems with the way things are is that with us living in an era where everything is cheaper and faster, the movies and films and such go away so quickly to the point that he describes it as, "That's it. There's no nourishment."

I see exactly what he's saying: it's like how in this day and age, a movie may stay in a theater for only a week or so (if it's a big box-office smash, maybe two or three weeks), then a couple of months later it's on DVD, and that's it. He's right, there really is no nourishment . . . not like there was in the days where a movie could last several weeks - maybe even a few months - in a theater, then you had to wait patiently for at least a year, if not longer, for it to see a home video release, but the wait was always worth it . . . not to mention, if a movie was really good, you could always see it repeated times because it would still be in theaters . . . and theater, of course, is a communal experience that you get to share with other people.

Of course, there are also detractors, such as George Lucas, who argues that the past was an age of "presentation," while also adding, "We're not in that world anymore. We're now in the world of you can have whatever you want whenever you want it."

Scorsese also notes of this that this makes sense for the businessman, but the art of filmmaking suffers in the process. But overall, I think this is another reason why it's so hard for me to really get into any newer shows or movies these days - aside from the fact that they almost all suck anyway because of poor content - because I'm not getting any of that nourishment Scorsese speaks of that I remember feeling growing up.
 

minor muppetz

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I feel like "Don't Stop Believing" by Journey is stereotypically a common song to sing at karaoke in fiction. Right now the only examples I can think of are in Family Guy and The Muppets, but I want to say that I've seen a few more shows/films where characters go to a karaoke bar and this is among the "go to" songs done. What is it about "Don't Stop Believing" that makes it so popular (at least in fiction) to do at karaoke?
 
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