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Christopher Reeve: 1952-2004

Rowlf's Roadie

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Too tragic. To think that Superman would be paralyzed from falling off a horse. RIP.
 

dbarrie

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Chris Reeve obit

Below is an obit of Christopher Reeve I wrote yesterday for my disability resource centre, the Centre for Independent Living in Toronto (CILT). You can also read the story on its Web site, at www.cilt.ca. In addition, I've also set up a temporary 'shrine' for Reeve on my personal Web site (www.homestead.com/dwgbworld/donbarrie.html; click ENTER HERE).

OI MuppetFan

http://www.cilt.ca/Whats%20New/what'snew.htm

'Superman' actor and activist Christopher Reeve dies (posted 10/12/2004)

Christopher Reeve, the actor and disability activist remembered for playing "Superman," a role that would define both his public and private life, died Sunday (Oct. 10) near his suburban New York home. He was 52.

Reeve, who became paralyzed from the neck down following a horseback riding accident in 1995, died from a heart attack and coma resulting from a bedsore that had spread into his bloodstream (septicemia). His publicist reports that he was surrounded by his family.

Dana Reeve, his wife of 12 years, thanked her husband's personal staff of nurses and aides, "as well as the millions of fans from around the world."

Though he would remain paralyzed for the last nine years of his life, he had defied the many people's grim predictions by being as independent as he could, despite a series of illnesses, and a dependence on ventilators and personal support workers. He contemplated suicide and euthanasia, but his wife's encouragement, in Reeve's words, "saved his life."

Following a period of rehab, he continued to act, direct movies, participated in advocacy functions (e.g. stem cell research), and also wrote two books, Still Me (1998) and Nothing is Impossible: Reflections on a New Life (2002).

He even made slight gains in mobility five years after he became quadriplegic. In 2000, Reeve regained movement in his index finger, and a specialized workout regimen made his legs and arms stronger. He also regained sensation, through rigorous therapy, in other areas of his body.

"I refuse to allow a disability to determine how I live my life," Reeve said. "I don't mean to be reckless, but setting a goal that seems a bit daunting actually is very helpful toward recovery."

Though his work as a SCI research advocate has eclipsed many of his earlier achievements, Reeve will be remembered for several film and TV appearances. In addition to the four Superman films made between 1978-87, he will also be remembered for his roles in Somewhere in Time (1980), Deathtrap (1982), Street Smart (1987), Switching Channels (1988), Noises Off (1992), The Remains of the Day (1993), the TV remake of Rear Window (1998) and his guest spots on The Muppet Show and Smallville. (Ironically, in the last movie he made prior to his accident, Above Suspicion, he played a man who became paralyzed from a gunshot wound.)

Reeve, born in 1952 in New York, will also be remembered for the personal acts of kindness towards others, both in and out of the Hollywood scene.

Our Resource Coordinator recalls a personal email he received from Reeve after contacting him on his 50th birthday two years ago.

"The Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation invited people to send him a greeting through his Web site," said Don Barrie. "About a week after I sent the message, I was surprised to receive a personal thank-you from him. It was completely unexpected, and it said a lot about the kind of person he was," he added.

"He wasn't Superman, but he possessed his heart and soul."

Reeve is survived by his wife, three children, his parents and a brother. There will be a private funeral service, followed by a public memorial to be held in New York.

Condolences to his family can be sent to Christopher Reeve's wife Dana, his children and the entire Reeve family, at www.christopherreeve.org.
 

JaniceFerSure

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That was beautiful dbarrie,directly from the heart.Thanks for sharing that with us.:sympathy:
 

Gorgon Heap

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A lot of you folks probably know this, but some may not, so I will share this little tidbit:

Christopher Reeve was good friends with a lot of the Muppet people, even before he was famous: Jim, Frank, Richard and Dave. In fact Reeve and the mother of his two elder children were particularly good friends with Frank Oz and the three spent much time together in England.

In fact, whenever Chris was around, he would help out on TMS, doing voices or carrying props.

This fact gets bandied around more than most: Chris carried one of the Japanese pole vaulters in the Bob Hope episode of TMS in '77.

He was one of the guest stars who not only was appropriately multitalented- he was funny, he was a fine pianist, and had a lovely singing voice- but was clearly having a ball (especially in Vet's Hospital :smile:)

Times like this, you gotta focus on the nice stuff you can remember about a person.

David "Gorgon Heap" Ebersole
 

JaniceFerSure

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Gorgon Heap said:
A lot of you folks probably know this, but some may not, so I will share this little tidbit:

Christopher Reeve was good friends with a lot of the Muppet people, even before he was famous: Jim, Frank, Richard and Dave. In fact Reeve and the mother of his two elder children were particularly good friends with Frank Oz and the three spent much time together in England.

In fact, whenever Chris was around, he would help out on TMS, doing voices or carrying props.

This fact gets bandied around more than most: Chris carried one of the Japanese pole vaulters in the Bob Hope episode of TMS in '77.

He was one of the guest stars who not only was appropriately multitalented- he was funny, he was a fine pianist, and had a lovely singing voice- but was clearly having a ball (especially in Vet's Hospital :smile:)

Times like this, you gotta focus on the nice stuff you can remember about a person.

David "Gorgon Heap" Ebersole
Thanks for sharing David.:smirk:
 

Docnzhoss

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I've never seen the Muppet Show episode with Christopher Reeve. Back in the olden days, my parents had a cardboard cutout of Reeve as Superman. When we went for walks around the neighborhood, my dad would place Superman at the garage door so he could look out the window and stand guard. It was a corny thing to do, and my dad was just trying to get me to laugh, but it's a fun Superman memory. I saw Christopher Reeve's wife on television yesterday (or maybe the day before). She's carrying the torch for him now, leading the charge for stem cell research.
 

Drtooth

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Of all the celebrity deaths this year, this is the one that saddens me the most. Mainly because he was getting better. He was just about to be able to feel and smell again. He was making great strides... then he passed on... it's just really sad, depressing stuff...
 
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