You Ever Notice...and What's the Deal...

fuzzygobo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 11, 2004
Messages
5,596
Reaction score
5,032
I was listening to an interview with Martin Scorsese, and his thoughts on the digital era of filmmaking that we now live in, and one of his biggest problems with the way things are is that with us living in an era where everything is cheaper and faster, the movies and films and such go away so quickly to the point that he describes it as, "That's it. There's no nourishment."

I see exactly what he's saying: it's like how in this day and age, a movie may stay in a theater for only a week or so (if it's a big box-office smash, maybe two or three weeks), then a couple of months later it's on DVD, and that's it. He's right, there really is no nourishment . . . not like there was in the days where a movie could last several weeks - maybe even a few months - in a theater, then you had to wait patiently for at least a year, if not longer, for it to see a home video release, but the wait was always worth it . . . not to mention, if a movie was really good, you could always see it repeated times because it would still be in theaters . . . and theater, of course, is a communal experience that you get to share with other people.

Of course, there are also detractors, such as George Lucas, who argues that the past was an age of "presentation," while also adding, "We're not in that world anymore. We're now in the world of you can have whatever you want whenever you want it."

Scorsese also notes of this that this makes sense for the businessman, but the art of filmmaking suffers in the process. But overall, I think this is another reason why it's so hard for me to really get into any newer shows or movies these days - aside from the fact that they almost all suck anyway because of poor content - because I'm not getting any of that nourishment Scorsese speaks of that I remember feeling growing up.
The same could be said about music too. Now you could make your own recordings at home. You don't need a studio or a record contract. And if you do get to Taylor Swift- level status, it's all about "moving product", not necessarily about making music.
Live shows are about wardrobe changes, having an army of backup singers and dancers, special effects, but there are still people who can move me with just a guitar or a piano and their voice, with nothing to hide behind.
Like the title says, it's pop music. Some of it is sweet. A lot is garbage. Very little nourishment, and completely disposable.
 

fuzzygobo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 11, 2004
Messages
5,596
Reaction score
5,032
Way back when, I appreciated The Beatles in their pre-fame days. At one point they were one of the worst bands in Liverpool (they couldn't even keep a permanent drummer), but they paid their dues playing for three years in crappy clubs in Hamburg, Germany, eight hours every night for very little money.
After they got famous, they sold millions of records, but their stage show suffered. They were reduced to playing 30 minutes, all the while being drowned out by screams.It got to be a bum deal. Having to play the same 12 songs, to crowds that can't even hear them. While they were getting worse as a live band, their records were getting better.They always tried to move forward, not keep rehashing the same formula.
But even after they split up, they still look back on their Hamburg days as a great time, when they were young, hungry, and had something to prove.
 

fuzzygobo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 11, 2004
Messages
5,596
Reaction score
5,032
Hey @ D'Snowth, back to MASH...
You ever notice in the mess tent, no matter what other slop Igor is serving up, often there's potato chips.Even Igor can't screw that up.
 

D'Snowth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2003
Messages
40,651
Reaction score
12,807
I actually got Igor's cookbook as a Christmas present last year, lol.
 

D'Snowth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2003
Messages
40,651
Reaction score
12,807
Mickey Mouse has generally had a consistency with his design and appearance over the decades, most notably his head basically just being a large circle with two slightly smaller circles for ears. However, it seems like there was a period of time from the 40s and even up into the 80s, where his design was slightly more stylized than usual, and the most noticable thing about this particular design, to me anyway, is how his ears were far more angular than they were round.
 

LittleJerry92

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Messages
17,247
Reaction score
7,600
I feel like "Don't Stop Believing" by Journey is stereotypically a common song to sing at karaoke in fiction. Right now the only examples I can think of are in Family Guy and The Muppets, but I want to say that I've seen a few more shows/films where characters go to a karaoke bar and this is among the "go to" songs done. What is it about "Don't Stop Believing" that makes it so popular (at least in fiction) to do at karaoke?
Probably because it’s so catchy, and also very motivating with the lyrics.
 

D'Snowth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2003
Messages
40,651
Reaction score
12,807
It seems every time we receive much-needed breaks from certain people, after a while, they all suddenly come back all at once . . . like right now, Kevin Hart, Steve Carell, and Meghan Trainor are all suddenly things again.
 

D'Snowth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2003
Messages
40,651
Reaction score
12,807
Her heavily auto-tuned voice that makes her singing sound so robotic and unnatural, which makes her songs sound all the more annoying (case in point: "All About That Bass").
 
Top