Does anybody think you're weird for watching Sesame Street?

GrouchFanatic

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The who call us weird or think that we're weird for watching Sesame Street (or any cartoon for that matter) here's what they don't understand,

When we watch these old clips\episodes, they bring us back when life was more simplistic and less problematic. It make us feel good. I'm not saying "I don't like the present!" I love my life and all but sometimes I like to take a walk down memory land a reminisce on how amazing old (certain) shows used to be. Nowadays most of the shows that are airing aren't even HALF as good as some of the shows back in the day. They can call us any name in the book. I'll keep doing what I love until the day I die. It makes me feel comfortable and happy inside and out.
I couldn’t agree with you more. I’m almost 29 & I’m still crazy about Sesame Street.

:wisdom::grouchy::smile::stick_out_tongue::frown::insatiable::super::batty::search::laugh:
 

minor muppetz

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I can't remember if I've posted in this thread before (and don't feel like searching through all ten pages of posts before posting this), but I'd like to say they don't.

Of course, as a kid, grade three and up, I feel like most people outside of my family and close friends (and I didn't have many close friends outside of scouts whom I regularly hung out with or had over at my house) didn't really know much about my Muppet fandom. A few of the near-teenaged people in my life might have sometimes given me a hard way to go about it, but otherwise most of my close friends and family either also liked Muppets or at least tolerated Muppets enough (though I clearly liked Muppets a lot more than they all did).

But I do recall a few times during my sixth grade year, there'd be some adults at my school or church who would ask me what I liked to watch, and I feel they gave a somewhat weirded out reaction to me saying I liked Muppets or Sesame Street, maybe they were just surprised that somebody my age liked those (though I don't think they gave the same kind of reaction to other "kids stuff" that I mentioned).

And I remember in tenth grade, shortly after I had really took in that Muppets and Sesame Street are made to be enjoyed by adults instead of kids (as well as a lot of children's properties), I did mention liking Sesame Street to some of my classmates and they seemed to think it was weird, though we didn't talk much about it afterwards (of course, maybe high school students don't really think about if something "for kids" can be enjoyed by adults, either - or maybe when they do start watching again, maybe with their kids, they pick up on things that make them wish they'd continued watching). But there was one twelfth grade class I took, pretty much all the other students at my table liked Sesame Street as well as many other Children's properties that I'd grown up with, and it was cool.

Of course now I don't think we'd have to worry now. We are in an era when a lot of people value nostalgia. A lot of adults, recent high school graduates, and probably high school/middle school students tend to still like what they did as children, whether less people are outgrowing things or they're becoming more nostalgic (there's a lot of shows I liked as a kid that I stopped caring much about for a long time only as an adult to really start caring about again). I don't think many people (particularly those who grew up at the same time as me or earlier) ever "outgrew" the classic animated Disney movies (I want to say the same about Looney Tunes, at least during the years when the shorts were heavily on television).
 

Blue Frackle

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I can't remember if I've posted in this thread before (and don't feel like searching through all ten pages of posts before posting this), but I'd like to say they don't.
I was wondering the same thing; on the index, the thread icon will have a mini version of your icon next to it.
 

crackmaster

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My middle brother used to think I was weird for watching Sesame, and when several known autism haters went after me, I had to delete a lot of my comments on Sesame Street videos and other kids' show videos because I didn't want people to make fun of me for it.

But now I know I'm not weird for watching Sesame because I'm really only in it for the cartoons, which influenced me in my writing and casting choices. My mom also loves Sesame.
 

Flaky Pudding

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I'm actually not very opened about the fact that I still watch Sesame Street, a little too embarrassed to talk about it. Aside from the people here on Muppet Central Forum, I don't really feel comfortable talking about my love for the show to anyone else. Not even my own family knows lol.

The only reason I post about it here is because my real identity is hidden under an avatar and username, it's completely unassociated with my actual self. Consider Flaky Pudding to be the Clark Kent to my Superman :stick_out_tongue:.

That being said, the main reason I watch the show isn't just for the nostalgia but also due to how creative Sesame Street is! Many of those animations are brilliant works of art, especially the stop-motion ones which is a style I've always had a soft spot for. The sheer creativity of SS inspires me to come up with my own unique ideas, it helps me think outside of the box. A perfect example of this is when I recently saw the Elmo's World episode with the tornado for the first time and I was absolutely blown away (no pun intended) by how they were able to make a puppet tornado! That is some next level puppetry right there!
 

mariolover

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I don't really watch Sesame Street regularly anymore. I still watch it occasionally for nostalgic reasons, but I've decided to develop more age-appropriate interests so I can relate to my friends more.

My parents are both really glad and told me "I hope you'd grow out of it because you were way too old to be watching it on a regular basis!"
 

Erine81981

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I'm actually not very opened about the fact that I still watch Sesame Street, a little too embarrassed to talk about it. Aside from the people here on Muppet Central Forum, I don't really feel comfortable talking about my love for the show to anyone else. Not even my own family knows lol.

The only reason I post about it here is because my real identity is hidden under an avatar and username, it's completely unassociated with my actual self. Consider Flaky Pudding to be the Clark Kent to my Superman :stick_out_tongue:.

That being said, the main reason I watch the show isn't just for the nostalgia but also due to how creative Sesame Street is! Many of those animations are brilliant works of art, especially the stop-motion ones which is a style I've always had a soft spot for. The sheer creativity of SS inspires me to come up with my own unique ideas, it helps me think outside of the box. A perfect example of this is when I recently saw the Elmo's World episode with the tornado for the first time and I was absolutely blown away (no pun intended) by how they were able to make a puppet tornado! That is some next level puppetry right there!
Not to steer you away from what you are saying but hopefully some day you'll let your parents know. Even if it comes up in a conversation. I'm not trying to tell you to do it right away. I'm just saying that I hope it comes up just so you don't have hide it. Don't get me wrong I remember not wanting to let others know about it but I finally grew out of not caring about what others thought. There are still times I think that but it's not about Sesame Street. I don't watch it on a regular basis but I still want to see newer episodes to see if there will be any old references to older characters or episodes from back in the day. But I do understand where you're coming from and I do respect your decision. Wouldn't ever push anyone to do something they didn't want to do. You do you and have fun getting to sneak around watching SS.
I don't really watch Sesame Street regularly anymore. I still watch it occasionally for nostalgic reasons, but I've decided to develop more age-appropriate interests so I can relate to my friends more.

My parents are both really glad and told me "I hope you'd grow out of it because you were way too old to be watching it on a regular basis!"
I know my parents said the same thing about hoping I would grow out of it. I kinda did during my teen years cause I didn't watch any Sesame Street during those years. I got back into watching it when Noggin started showing the classic episodes and ever since I still will watch the newer seasons and ever so often watch a classic episode. I think you'll keep it with you until whenever. I know I have and it won't ever leave my mind or love.
 

Old Thunder

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I don't really watch Sesame Street regularly anymore. I still watch it occasionally for nostalgic reasons, but I've decided to develop more age-appropriate interests so I can relate to my friends more.
C.S. Lewis has an absolutely brilliant quote that I love, using 1 Corinthians 13:11 to anchor it. I’m including the full quote for context, and highlighting the best part.

Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

Just because Sesame Street is marketed towards children doesn’t mean it isn’t age-appropriate for you now that you’ve become an adult. In fact I would say it’s far more age-appropriate because its morals are on a far higher level than a lot of adult-oriented media. If you don’t feel like watching the show, that’s fine, but don’t give it up just for some validation.
 

Detritusarisen

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For sure, I have a lot of intrests that are typically targeted to children that I get a lot of flak for liking, among sesame street, the wiggles, strawberry shortcake, raggedy ann, chuck e cheese, mlp etc.
I tend to find that people around my age range, I'm 18, are a lot more accepting of strange intrests which I think is really nice, though that also could be because my friends have the same intrests :excited:
 

YellowYahooey

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When I was in elementary school, and even early in junior high, some people saw me as being weird because of my watching of "Sesame Street". In fact, some kids even bullied me, even to the extent of using a certain word that starts with "R" and rhymes with "card" towards me. Thankfully, there were no injuries from the bullying, but however, it didn't stop me from watching the show, despite that the bullying continued. I guess you could say I used to be highly addicted to the show.

Fortunately, in February 1985, I lost interest in the show, and a few years afterwards the bullying ended, as I became a better person.

I may watch some sketches and skits for nostalgia reasons on occasion nowadays, but I am more interested in current activities and hobbies most of which are designed for mature adults.
 
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